Providence for the Finale

I meant to get this up two days ago, but couldn’t. Sorry. Anyway, this is the final post from my East Coast trip. On July 29th, the day after I left Boston, I made a quick stop in Providence to see a few tugboats.

JoAnne Reinauer III

Sitting at the McAllister dock is the JoAnne Reinauer III.

JoAnne Reinauer III

The tall articulated tug resembles a giraffe, among other things.

JoAnne Reinauer III

Her JAK coupler system really sticks out of her side.

Puma

Behind is McAllister’s attractive tug Puma.

Puma

However, Puma decides to leave for an assist job. If only that car wasn’t there…

Puma

There she goes…

JoAnne Reinauer III

Back to JoAnne, she is here waiting for her barge to finish working cargo across the harbor.

JoAnne Reinauer III

She was originally a conventional tug, and she used to look like this. Quite the transformation.

JoAnne Reinauer III

I think I prefer the looks of the older version.

Shannon McAllister

Now we have a new guest at the dock.

Shannon McAllister

Shannon McAllister has appeared, and is taking awhile to dock herself.

Shannon McAllister

Anyway, as I said it was a quick stop in Providence. I am done.

So, that was my East Coast trip. After this, I spent two nights in the Adirondacks, two nights in Ohio, and I am now back home typing this. It was nice to see some new things, but hopefully lakers are on the menu soon!

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Beantown

After touring the USS Constitution in Boston on Sunday, I did a little strolling around the Charlestown Navy Yard and found a few other nautical objects of interest.

Cassin Young

The retired WWII destroyer Cassin Young is moored in the next slip over from Old Ironsides.

Cassin Young

The Cassin Young is open for public touring, but oddly enough, it was not open on Sunday.

Cassin Young

Here’s a close-up of the ship’s bridge and battle marks.

Cassin Young

And just in case you were unsure of her name.

historians

There two men were both staring at the hahbah, so I turned around to see what was there.

Provincetown

Oh, it’s just the cruise vessel Provincetown II.

Provincetown II

She sure was having a party – music playing and people yelling. I wish I was onboard.

USCGC Escanaba

Across the hahbah at the Coast Guard base sits the USCGC Escanaba. Since she’s named after a small Great Lakes port, I found it important that I take a picture.

Rookie

I also got appearances from two water taxis. The Rookie is probably new on the job, considering her name.

Rita

Following right behind is the Rita.

Cassin Young

Further into the yard, outside the Constitution museum, I can get another nice view of the Cassin Young. Any guesses on what’s in front of her?

drydock

If you said drydock, good job! This old-looking drydock is being prepped for a very important visitor next year – the USS Constitution. Her drydocking is expected to take several years, so I was glad to tour her now before she goes in.

Liberty Teresa

Flipping ahead to Monday morning, I followed up my Philadelphia experience with a Boston duck tour aboard old Liberty Teresa.

Molly Molasses

On the Charles River we passed some other ducks, and Molly Molasses was especially photogenic. I didn’t see many other boats on the tour, though.

Henry Longfellow

In fact, the pretty Henry Longfellow was the only non-duck we passed by.

Red Sox Nathan

Then there was Red Sox Nathan. Yuck. Go Tigers!

Swan Boat

Back on dry ground, I caught this large swan boat sailing around Boston Public Garden.

John S. Damrell

After further walking, I ended up on the waterfront, where I found the city fireboat John S. Damrell. She was built in Kingston, Ontario on the St. Lawrence River.

Michael B. Meli

The small Michael B. Meli also showed up.

Fort Warren

At the docks near the Aquarium, there were a few more. Fort Warren was this one’s name.

Majesty

The Majesty was far more majestic, however.

Regency

The third one in the row was Regency.

Liberty Clipper

And then across the slip was the Liberty Clipper.

Liberty Clipper

Good looking boat. She must do cruises since the pulled out a few minutes later.

Rita

As did Rita. Unfortunately Rookie didn’t show up this time.

Godzilla

Last but not least, the Godzilla speedboat. Yeah…

Anyway, that concludes my Boston adventures. I decided not to include all the historical sites like I did in my Philly post, but I did see them.

So, I do have one more (short) post to come from this coastal trip, and I will try to post it tomorrow. Stick around!

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Old Ironsides

I normally try not to post after 10 PM, but I was busy for most of the day. Right now I’m on a peaceful lake in the Adirondacks, but this post will feature photos from this past Sunday. After New York City, I ventured up to New England, and visited Boston, Massachusetts for the first time in my life. Not knowing much about the boat scene there, I chose the most obvious route and toured the USS Constitution.

USS Constitution

The Constitution is a rather famous vessel, so I’m not sure how much I need to say about her.

USS Constitution

First of all, her nickname is “Old Ironsides” – but her sides are made of wood.

USS Constitution

Secondly, she is still a commissioned warship in the U.S. Navy – she hasn’t fought a battle in a very long time, but she is still in the active fleet and sails several times each year.

USS Constitution

The ship is now open for public tours, for free, at Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston.

USS Constitution

I began by getting some shots of her from the dock, but couldn’t seem to get the whole thing in one frame.

USS Constitution

The vessel is beautifully designed.

USS Constitution

Onboard, it seems like a reminder of visiting the tall ships last September in Windsor.

USS Constitution

I’m pretty sure this is the oldest active vessel I’ve ever boarded. The Constitution was built in 1797 and was one of the six original frigates in the U.S. Navy.

USS Constitution

She earned her nickname during the War of 1812, when a sailor remarked that the ship’s sides must be made out of iron, because the cannonballs bounced right off.

USS Constitution

But really, it’s some very strong wood that’s held up for a long time.

USS Constitution

U ought to post a shot of the main deck, since I mostly just looked up and took pictures of the masts.

USS Constitution

One deck below, the ship’s many cannons are lined up, ready for battle.

USS Constitution

The next deck down is normally open, but on Sunday it was closed due to rain.

USS Constitution

I’m not sure what these are, but I’m sure somebody who reads this does.

USS Constitution

This sign seemed very profound, but I have my doubts that it was there while the ship was in battle.

USS Constitution

The fancy rooms toward the stern were barred off, but you can get a good sense of them just from this view.

USS Constitution

Back on top, I took some more shots of the masts & rigging, one of my favorite things to photograph.

USS Constitution

It seems incredible to think that these ships were once the mainstay, as they now seem like works of art that would never survive against the pounding oceans.

USS Constitution

But clearly, the USS Constitution never had any problems with that.

USS Constitution

Back on shore, here’s an outside view of her stern, which looks like a little bubble.

USS Constitution

Sheesh… even back here I can’t manage to get the whole thing in one frame.

USS Constitution

When not out on a sail, the Constitution is kept safe in her slip by this floating barrier.

USS Constitution

Naturelly I have to grab some stern shots before moving on to my next stop.

USS Constitution

So one more shot of the majestic warship.

USS Constitution

And I’ll leave you with this for tonight.

Boston didn’t have my normal flow of freighter and/or tug traffic, but I was still able to see enough to justify at least one more post. So expect another one tomorrow (possibly the last from this trip, since there are no ships in the Adirondacks). But there are mountains, and that’s almost as good.

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Action on the East River

I have one more post from Friday in New York to offer you. After finishing up on Staten Island, I crossed the impressive Verrazano-Narrows Bridge into Brooklyn, where I spent a few minutes on the East River before having lunch.

New York

At a park just south of the Brooklyn Bridge, I have a good view of lower Manhattan, which I didn’t really get to on Thursday. One World Trade Center, the tallest in the picture, is new since my last visit.

South Street Seaport

The South Street Seaport Museum has slimmed down a bit, but still has a nice roster. In this shot, from left to right, are Wavertree, Lettie G. HowardPeking, a Shark speedboat, and the lightship Ambrose.

Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is impressive as usual, although I didn’t drive or walk on it.

Brooklyn Bridge

The bridge is reminiscent of the Roebling Bridge in Cincinnati from last summer, which is understandable since Roebling built them both.

Henry Hudson

The East River isn’t a commercial hub to the degree of the Kill Van Kull, and the most frequent traffic is passenger vessels. The Henry Hudson was the first to go by in the short time I was there.

Rae

But there are still some tugs to be seen. The small tug Rae motors by, pushing a barge filled with scrap metal.

Rae

Rae seems to be a bit undersized for the barge, as they were getting along quite slowly.

Rae

But soon enough she is on her way.

Thomas D. Witte

But the fun isn’t over. More vessels are incoming.

Thomas D. Witte

First up is the Thomas D. Witte with a pair of empty barges.

Thomas D. Witte

The rare shade of blue on the Thomas D. Witte may look familiar. She is owned by DonJon Marine, which also co-owns the tug Ken Boothe Sr. on the Great Lakes.

Joyce D. Brown

Oh and look at that – another tug! The Joyce D. Brown is on the hip of a work barge.

Joyce D. Brown

Joyce is a nice tug, as tugs always look good in green paint.

Thomas D. Witte

Thomas D. Witte looks good with One World Trade Center.

Thomas D. Witte

And the Witte heads on to somewhere further upriver, where those barges will be loaded with scrap metal.

Joyce D. Brown

And Joyce D. Brown gets off to her destination too.

Fiorello LaGuardia

At this same time, the ferry Fiorello LaGuardia departs the dock right next to me, and turns to head downriver.

Fiorello LaGuardia

The LaGuardia is a catamaran, like many of the ferries running around here.

Atlantica

Approaching out the other way is the Atlantica, passing the Joyce D. Brown. I’m not sure what sailing vessel is next to Lady Liberty.

LaGuardia and Washington

As the Fiorello LaGuardia continues to spin, she passes the incoming ferry George Washington.

Fiorello LaGuardia

One more close-up before she heads off.

LaGuardia and Washington

And off she goes, as the Washington makes her turn to dock where the LaGuardia just was.

George Washington

George Washington doesn’t appear to be a catamaran, but still has a similar profile.

George Washington

Her turn wasn’t as exciting as LaGuardia‘s, but the lighting was nice nonetheless.

Atlantica

The fancy Atlantica was moving very slowly, but finally got out in front of me for a good shot.

harbor

The Fiorello LaGuardia approaches the Joyce D. Brown in the outer harbor with the lady looking on.

After that, I checked out the grounds of the 1964 World’s Fair in Queens, then said goodbye to the city. But the trip continued, so I have more posts coming.

P.S. – I have been using the “Action” title too much recently. I need to come up with something else.

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Action on the Kill Van Kull II

Here’s another one for you tugboat lovers (like me). Yesterday I left off with the crewboat Grace D. on the Kill Van Kull in New York harbor on Friday morning. The non-stop action continued there, so I’ll pick right back up.

Penn No. 4

The impressive articulated tug Penn No. 4 sailed by. The No. 4 is a good-looking product of McDermott Shipyards (like Thomas from yesterday). She is part of the Kirby Corp. fleet, but as her name indicates, she used to sail for Penn Maritime (purchased by Kirby recently).

Penn No. 4

Her articulated pins are new this year, but her raised pilothouse has been there for years.

Penn No. 4

Penn No. 4 moves past her fleetmate (also ex-Penn) Amberjack, and gets along to wherever she’s going.

Amstel Falcon and Brendan Turecamo

Next, beyond Kimberly Poling, the tug Brendan Turecamo is returning to home base after escorting the oncoming Amstel Falcon.

Jill Reinauer

But then the Jill Reinauer storms out of nowhere.

Jill Reinauer

Jill is a great looking tug, and looks to be in excellent shape.

Jill Reinauer

She moves by fast and is gone as quickly as she came.

Amstel Falcon

The large Amstel Falcon was built in 2o13, and appears to be loaded with something from New Jersey.

Amstel Falcon

I don’t know much more about her, but here’s a stern shot.

Amstel Falcon

And a stern shot as she lumbers out to the main harbor.

RTC 81

Reinauer Transportation’s RTC 81 storms by next, looking empty.

B. Franklin Reinauer

The B. Franklin Reinauer is doing the pushing. Her looks are… odd, but saving space is the objective here, and her designer did a good job in that regard.

James Turecamo

At the same time came the most classic tug of the day, the canaller James Turecamo.

James Turecamo

Built back in the 1960s, the James Turecamo used to run on the Great Lakes early in her career.

James Turecamo and B. Franklin Reinauer

The classic canaller meets the newfangled articulated tug.

James Turecamo

And James Turecamo deserves a stern shot as she heads away.

RTC 81

And so does B. Franklin Reinauer and RTC 81.

Harry McNeal

Next up is the tiny construction tug Harry McNeal, which is heading for Bayonne to pick up a small barge.

Pacific Dawn

She can be seen on the left as Pacific Dawn rolls by.

Pacific Dawn

A Gulf-style tug, I’ve never heard of this tug before, so I don’t know what her work is in New York.

Pacific Dawn

But she presses on light tug, westbound.

Chesapeake Coast

Now, I will close out this post with my last Staten Island boat of the day. It’s the push tug Chesapeake Coast of Dann Ocean Towing. I’m not sure what Dann was going for in her design, but it’s definitely interesting to see.Chesapeake Coast

She and her sister Discovery Coast have been nicknamed the “Twin Towers” for their distinctive profiles. I actually rather like them.

Anyway, she sails on, and it’s time for me to leave the Kill Van Kull. The traffic would continue to flow, but I had other things to do on my last day in the city. So, I have one more New York post for tomorrow.

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Action on the Kill Van Kull I

Yesterday’s post encompassed Thursday, and a bit of Friday morning. I’ll continue with Friday in this one.

Pacific

After visiting the boneyard, I moved on to the Kill Van Kull, a narrow waterway running between Staten Island, NY and Bayonne, NJ. Docked at IMTT Bayonne was the tug Amberjack and her tank barge Pacific. They’re owned by Kirby Offshore Marine.

Kimberly Poling

Right next to me on Staten was the tug Kimberly Poling, and her tank barge Edwin A. Poling. The U.S.-flag tank barge trade is booming on the East Coast, making tugboats very easy to find around here.

Thomas

In the first 30 minutes, things were annoyingly slow. Finally, the tug Thomas of Weeks Marine showed up. Weeks is a leading construction firm on the East Coast, and also owns a marine construction fleet in Canada as well.

Amberjack and Thomas

Thomas is heading for IMTT to gas up before going back to whatever she was doing.

Kimberly Poling and Fowairet

Here comes something a little bigger behind Kimberly Poling

Fowairet

Fowairet is owned by the United Arab Shipping Company, and eases through the Kill Van Kull after departing New Jersey.

Fowairet

I rarely ever catch container ships, but this is now my second of the summer after seeing the Montreal Express in Varennes, QC about a month ago.

Fowairet

Fowairet dwarfs the Amberjack as she passes.

Fowairet

The Fowairet is 909 feet long and 105 feet wide, so she would fit through the Soo Locks if she sailed on the Great Lakes.

Fowairet

The ship has both her name and port of registry in Arabic on the side of the stern.

Fowairet

The Fowairet moves closer to the Atlantic Ocean, and eventually Norfolk.

HMS Justice

After that, the towboat HMS Justice comes up the KVK.

St. Andrews and HMS Justice

The Justice, owned by Harley Marine Services, goes over to IMTT to assist her fleetmate St. Andrews. The latter is departing with her tank barge Richardson Sea.

Laura K. Moran

While they’re working, the Laura K. Moran returns from her job escorting the Fowairet.

Laura K. Moran

The Z-drive tug packs 5,100 horsepower, making her one of the most powerful tugs in New York harbor.

Richardson Sea

HMS Justice and St. Andrews now have the Richardson Sea out of the slip and almost ready to go.

Sunny Williams

The tiny refueling tanker Sunny Williams speeds by next, passing the lone windmill on the New Jersey side.

Sunny Williams and St. Andrews

She passes the St. Andrews while heading to wherever she’s going.

St. Andrews

St. Andrews is a little tug by New York standards for pushing oil barges, but with 2,000 horsepower she does a good job. Harley Marine is a power on the west coast, but here in New York they only have three tugs.

St. Andrews and Yemitzis

While heading away, she passes the tug Yemitzis heading for IMTT.

Richardson Sea

St. Andrews and Richardson Sea head away, and leave this post for good.

Yemitzis

Yemitzis, meanwhile, is owned by Henry Marine Service, and is going to refuel next to Thomas. A former Pennsylvania Railroad tug, her cabins are not original. She looks like a yacht, but is still a commercial tug.

Yemitzis

But even so, she’s an attractive tug and it was nice to see her.

Grace D.

The launch Grace D. makes a quick cameo, speeding eastbound, and her appearance will close out this post.

I still have more from Friday, so I will resume tomorrow.

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Boroughing

At the end of my lone Philadelphia post, I said that I was moving on to bigger and better things.

Manhattan

“Better” is subjective, but I think I got it about right.

Empire State Building

This is my second visit to Manhattan, but the last time (2009), I didn’t go up the Empire State Building. So that was priority #1 on Thursday morning.

432 Park Avenue

But on this visit, the Empire State has been surpassed by two other skyscrapers. The newest, 432 Park Avenue, isn’t even finished yet.

GE Building

The GE Building blocks my view of Central Park.

Flatiron Building

From up here, it’s hard to believe that the old Flatiron Building was once considered a skyscraper. The sky must have been lower back then, I guess.

Chrysler Building

My favorite of the New York skyscrapers is the Chrysler Building. One of the finest looking structures ever built.

Pigeon

I photographed one of the city natives on the observation deck. He just wouldn’t stay behind the railing.

Manhattan

So anyway, I’m sure you’re tired of city pictures by now, so I’ll leave you with this one before I turn to the harbor.

Times Square

Well, I also paid a visit to Times Square on Thursday. Other events that day included Central Park and High Line Park (which was new to me and is totally awesome).

Graveyard

On Friday morning, I did some exploring around Staten Island. I was able to locate Witte’s Scrapyard, although there doesn’t seem to be much scrapping going on here.

Witte's

This appears to be a barge of some sort.

Bloxom

The best part (of what I could see) was the steam tug Bloxom, which has been abandoned here for several decades. One of her sisters, James A. Hannah, has appeared on this blog before in Hamilton, Ontario.

fungus

There’s also a fungus among us.

jellyfish

Now, please enjoy this large jellyfish sailing downbound, and stay tuned for tomorrow’s saga.

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