Action on the Kill Van Kull II

Here’s another one for you tugboat lovers (like me). Yesterday I left off with the crewboat Grace D. on the Kill Van Kull in New York harbor on Friday morning. The non-stop action continued there, so I’ll pick right back up.

Penn No. 4

The impressive articulated tug Penn No. 4 sailed by. The No. 4 is a good-looking product of McDermott Shipyards (like Thomas from yesterday). She is part of the Kirby Corp. fleet, but as her name indicates, she used to sail for Penn Maritime (purchased by Kirby recently).

Penn No. 4

Her articulated pins are new this year, but her raised pilothouse has been there for years.

Penn No. 4

Penn No. 4 moves past her fleetmate (also ex-Penn) Amberjack, and gets along to wherever she’s going.

Amstel Falcon and Brendan Turecamo

Next, beyond Kimberly Poling, the tug Brendan Turecamo is returning to home base after escorting the oncoming Amstel Falcon.

Jill Reinauer

But then the Jill Reinauer storms out of nowhere.

Jill Reinauer

Jill is a great looking tug, and looks to be in excellent shape.

Jill Reinauer

She moves by fast and is gone as quickly as she came.

Amstel Falcon

The large Amstel Falcon was built in 2o13, and appears to be loaded with something from New Jersey.

Amstel Falcon

I don’t know much more about her, but here’s a stern shot.

Amstel Falcon

And a stern shot as she lumbers out to the main harbor.

RTC 81

Reinauer Transportation’s RTC 81 storms by next, looking empty.

B. Franklin Reinauer

The B. Franklin Reinauer is doing the pushing. Her looks are… odd, but saving space is the objective here, and her designer did a good job in that regard.

James Turecamo

At the same time came the most classic tug of the day, the canaller James Turecamo.

James Turecamo

Built back in the 1960s, the James Turecamo used to run on the Great Lakes early in her career.

James Turecamo and B. Franklin Reinauer

The classic canaller meets the newfangled articulated tug.

James Turecamo

And James Turecamo deserves a stern shot as she heads away.

RTC 81

And so does B. Franklin Reinauer and RTC 81.

Harry McNeal

Next up is the tiny construction tug Harry McNeal, which is heading for Bayonne to pick up a small barge.

Pacific Dawn

She can be seen on the left as Pacific Dawn rolls by.

Pacific Dawn

A Gulf-style tug, I’ve never heard of this tug before, so I don’t know what her work is in New York.

Pacific Dawn

But she presses on light tug, westbound.

Chesapeake Coast

Now, I will close out this post with my last Staten Island boat of the day. It’s the push tug Chesapeake Coast of Dann Ocean Towing. I’m not sure what Dann was going for in her design, but it’s definitely interesting to see.Chesapeake Coast

She and her sister Discovery Coast have been nicknamed the “Twin Towers” for their distinctive profiles. I actually rather like them.

Anyway, she sails on, and it’s time for me to leave the Kill Van Kull. The traffic would continue to flow, but I had other things to do on my last day in the city. So, I have one more New York post for tomorrow.

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Action on the Kill Van Kull I

Yesterday’s post encompassed Thursday, and a bit of Friday morning. I’ll continue with Friday in this one.

Pacific

After visiting the boneyard, I moved on to the Kill Van Kull, a narrow waterway running between Staten Island, NY and Bayonne, NJ. Docked at IMTT Bayonne was the tug Amberjack and her tank barge Pacific. They’re owned by Kirby Offshore Marine.

Kimberly Poling

Right next to me on Staten was the tug Kimberly Poling, and her tank barge Edwin A. Poling. The U.S.-flag tank barge trade is booming on the East Coast, making tugboats very easy to find around here.

Thomas

In the first 30 minutes, things were annoyingly slow. Finally, the tug Thomas of Weeks Marine showed up. Weeks is a leading construction firm on the East Coast, and also owns a marine construction fleet in Canada as well.

Amberjack and Thomas

Thomas is heading for IMTT to gas up before going back to whatever she was doing.

Kimberly Poling and Fowairet

Here comes something a little bigger behind Kimberly Poling

Fowairet

Fowairet is owned by the United Arab Shipping Company, and eases through the Kill Van Kull after departing New Jersey.

Fowairet

I rarely ever catch container ships, but this is now my second of the summer after seeing the Montreal Express in Varennes, QC about a month ago.

Fowairet

Fowairet dwarfs the Amberjack as she passes.

Fowairet

The Fowairet is 909 feet long and 105 feet wide, so she would fit through the Soo Locks if she sailed on the Great Lakes.

Fowairet

The ship has both her name and port of registry in Arabic on the side of the stern.

Fowairet

The Fowairet moves closer to the Atlantic Ocean, and eventually Norfolk.

HMS Justice

After that, the towboat HMS Justice comes up the KVK.

St. Andrews and HMS Justice

The Justice, owned by Harley Marine Services, goes over to IMTT to assist her fleetmate St. Andrews. The latter is departing with her tank barge Richardson Sea.

Laura K. Moran

While they’re working, the Laura K. Moran returns from her job escorting the Fowairet.

Laura K. Moran

The Z-drive tug packs 5,100 horsepower, making her one of the most powerful tugs in New York harbor.

Richardson Sea

HMS Justice and St. Andrews now have the Richardson Sea out of the slip and almost ready to go.

Sunny Williams

The tiny refueling tanker Sunny Williams speeds by next, passing the lone windmill on the New Jersey side.

Sunny Williams and St. Andrews

She passes the St. Andrews while heading to wherever she’s going.

St. Andrews

St. Andrews is a little tug by New York standards for pushing oil barges, but with 2,000 horsepower she does a good job. Harley Marine is a power on the west coast, but here in New York they only have three tugs.

St. Andrews and Yemitzis

While heading away, she passes the tug Yemitzis heading for IMTT.

Richardson Sea

St. Andrews and Richardson Sea head away, and leave this post for good.

Yemitzis

Yemitzis, meanwhile, is owned by Henry Marine Service, and is going to refuel next to Thomas. A former Pennsylvania Railroad tug, her cabins are not original. She looks like a yacht, but is still a commercial tug.

Yemitzis

But even so, she’s an attractive tug and it was nice to see her.

Grace D.

The launch Grace D. makes a quick cameo, speeding eastbound, and her appearance will close out this post.

I still have more from Friday, so I will resume tomorrow.

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Boroughing

At the end of my lone Philadelphia post, I said that I was moving on to bigger and better things.

Manhattan

“Better” is subjective, but I think I got it about right.

Empire State Building

This is my second visit to Manhattan, but the last time (2009), I didn’t go up the Empire State Building. So that was priority #1 on Thursday morning.

432 Park Avenue

But on this visit, the Empire State has been surpassed by two other skyscrapers. The newest, 432 Park Avenue, isn’t even finished yet.

GE Building

The GE Building blocks my view of Central Park.

Flatiron Building

From up here, it’s hard to believe that the old Flatiron Building was once considered a skyscraper. The sky must have been lower back then, I guess.

Chrysler Building

My favorite of the New York skyscrapers is the Chrysler Building. One of the finest looking structures ever built.

Pigeon

I photographed one of the city natives on the observation deck. He just wouldn’t stay behind the railing.

Manhattan

So anyway, I’m sure you’re tired of city pictures by now, so I’ll leave you with this one before I turn to the harbor.

Times Square

Well, I also paid a visit to Times Square on Thursday. Other events that day included Central Park and High Line Park (which was new to me and is totally awesome).

Graveyard

On Friday morning, I did some exploring around Staten Island. I was able to locate Witte’s Scrapyard, although there doesn’t seem to be much scrapping going on here.

Witte's

This appears to be a barge of some sort.

Bloxom

The best part (of what I could see) was the steam tug Bloxom, which has been abandoned here for several decades. One of her sisters, James A. Hannah, has appeared on this blog before in Hamilton, Ontario.

fungus

There’s also a fungus among us.

tracks

This photo is a sneak preview of my next spot on Staten Island. This post has been short, but I want to start this spot in tomorrow’s post, so I’ll end here for now.

jellyfish

So enjoy this large jellyfish sailing downbound, and stay tuned for tomorrow’s saga.

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Brotherly Love and Riding Ducks

Today was a perfect day to get out of the suburbs and spend a few hours in the city. So, into the city I go…

Independence Hall

But rather than go into Detroit, I decided to change things up and visit Philadelphia instead.

Independence Hall

I’ve already visited New York, Baltimore, and Washington before, but this is my first time in Philly. Naturally, Independence Hall was on my short list of things to see.

Congress

Congress was out for a brief recess, so I was able to enter their meeting room. Mr. Hancock usually sits in the chair in the center.

Independence Hall

I was very excited to stand in the room where my favorite scene from the musical “1776” took place. I’ll have to watch that again soon.

pointing man

This statue was in the park outside the Hall, but I can’t remember who that guy is…

tomb of the unknown soldier

In another nearby park sits the Revolutionary War’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which was undergoing to restoration work.

Chinatown

A few blocks over is Philadelphia’s Chinatown.

Duck 51

Were you expecting boats in this post? I’ve got Duck 51 for you, which happened to be my ride for 90 minutes in the afternoon. Yes, I am embracing the tourist experience.

Duck 51

I didn’t know the name of the craft until I found the life ring. Turns out, it was built in Michigan and it is ex-Army.

Washington

I was on the wrong side of the duck to get a picture of the Rocky stairs, but I got old Washington on his horse instead.

city hall

Something I didn’t know about Philadelphia is that they have a very impressive city hall.

Elvis

And even the most avid tourists don’t know about Philadelphia’s most famous street performer.

old street

Elfreth’s Alley here is considered the oldest street in America, dating back to 1702.

Weeks

We took a quick 20-minute plunge into the Delaware River next. We didn’t get close to any boats, but I was able to spot a few thing of interest. In this shot is the Weeks Marine yard in Camden, NJ. Weeks is a major marine construction & dredging company, and apparently they have a lot of cranes.

USS New Jersey

The USS New Jersey is now a museum in Camden.

boats

Here is your daily dose of freighters. The closest one, in black, is the Nikol H. In the background, the tug Lucky D. has an asphalt barge in the anchorage, and the ships Luzon StraitAracena CarrierSanta Catharina, and Pannonia G. are all docked in Camden, and barely visible in this shot since three of them are gray and we didn’t get any closer.

pier

On the Philly side there are some nice piers, but not many boats that we went by in our little amphibious craft.

Jupiter

The best thing we passed was the 1902 tug Jupiter, next to her barge Poplar. Not as impressive as a 1702 street, but still pretty neat.

colonials

Back on dry ground, we spotted some of the locals.

no parking

This pretty much speaks for itself. Unfortunately you won’t find these signs in Detroit.

United States

And while I wasn’t very interested in seeing boats today, I couldn’t pass up on getting a shot of the ocean liner United States. The record holder for the fastest trans-Atlantic crossing is rotting away at Pier 82, hoping that her preservation efforts come up successful. It will be a mammoth project to save her, but my fingers are crossed that it will work. Just in case, though, I’ve got some photos now.

United States

So I’ll leave you with the United States, and this is all from my day in Philadelphia. Tomorrow I shall move on to bigger and brighter things.

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Return to Detroit’s Shores II

Oh, hello there. I finally finished my long Canada saga yesterday, but I’m back right away with some pictures that I took two days ago on July 16.

Remember what Belle Isle looks like? It sure has been awhile…

Atlantic Erie

Cruising downbound is the Atlantic Erie, which is a rare bird for me.

Atlantic Erie

The 736-footer is headed to Belledune, New Brunswick with a load of coal for the generating station there. I wish I could tag along.

Atlantic Erie

Like her fleetmate Atlantic Huron in my last post, the Atlantic Erie is a semi-saltwater vessel, and I have a hard time catching her. Somehow I’m not surprised that I got great sightings of both after my main camera kicked the bucket.

Atlantic Erie

If you pay close attention, you may notice that the camera I used here is making its tugboathunter debut. It definitely beats my backup that I used on my last two days in Canada, and my friend Terry gets a huge thank you for letting me borrow it for the next few weeks. Thanks Terry!

Atlantic Erie

The crappy color in these is my fault, not the camera’s, so I apologize for that. Anyway, you can still make out the Atlantic Erie as she continues on her way to the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Ovation

Flying by next was the charter yacht Ovation, based on Lake St. Clair. She was heading to downtown Detroit.

Infinity

Right behind the Ovation is her fleetmate Infinity, also heading downtown. This seems familiar to me…

Diamond Belle

A third straight passenger vessel, the Diamond Belle, rolls by next, but she is not stopping downtown like the previous two.

sky

As I wait for my last boat, I notice that the sky behind me is looking pretty dramatic. I had sun, but it went away before the boat arrived.

Algosteel

Recognize this one?

Algosteel

The Algosteel is heading for Windsor with a cargo of limestone from Thessalon, Ontario.

Algosteel

This is my third Algosteel post in a row, which might be a record for me.

Ambassador Bridge

I feel like I need more though, so I follow the Algosteel down to Riverside Park, where the sky is still impressive.

Westcott and Algosteel

The busy mailboat J.W. Westcott II departs the dock to go meet the Algosteel.

Algosteel

Now the sun is out, so these ended up as my best shots of the day.

Diamond Belle

Still on the same cruise as before, Diamond Belle has turned around and is heading back up.\

Algosteel & Diamond Belle

She meets the Steel, which is starting to check down to dock.

Belle, Algosteel & Westcott

The Diamond Belle, Algosteel, and J.W. Westcott II form a very diverse trio. To my delight, the Westcott and Steel exchanged horn salutes as they parted ways.

Algosteel & Westcott

I was hoping to see the Algosteel do a 180 to dock at the stone dock across the river, but was a bit perplexed that she wasn’t doing it.

J.W. Westcott II

J.W. Westcott II returns to the dock as the Diamond Belle sails away.

J.W. Westcott II

The Renaissance Center is always a great background for the Westcott. With Belle Isle in the shot as well, these are three Detroit icons.

Huron Maid and J.W. Westcott II

After spending the Spring in Port Huron, the pilot boat Huron Maid is back on station and ready for work. They use the Westcott much more, but the Maid still does many of the pilot exchanges.

Algosteel

And the lovely Algosteel will close out this post. As she passed the stone dock, I realized that she was going to Sterling Fuel first, so no 180 turn for me. I guess next time I’ll try Delray Park.

At this point, I really have no idea what will be posted on here during the next two weeks or so. It could be a lot, or it could be nothing. So… don’t be too surprised if things get quiet around here again. Hopefully there’s more Algosteel on the schedule…

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Goodbye to Ontario

I meant to post this yesterday, but I was having some technical difficulties in the evening. So here it is today instead. I left you off around lunchtime on July 1 at the Welland Canal, and the Algosteel had just arrived in Lock 7 and was ready to be raised.

Algosteel

After a few minutes of getting tied up and in position, the 730 foot ship rises.

Algosteel

When she’s finished, lines are tied off and the ship gives 1 blast of her horn. The lock gates open, and the Algosteel inches out.

Algosteel

She’s going slower than she could, since she’s waiting for the next downbound ship to appear before proceeding.

Algosteel

The mighty ship towers over everybody around her.

Algosteel

And she owns the best name of any ship on the Great Lakes.

Algosteel

After she picks it up a bit, I go to catch her riding the approach wall.

Algosteel

The next ship is in sight, so the Algosteel starts churning water to exit the approach zone.

Algosteel

Once again, her size is pretty impressive.

Algosteel

With some fine examining, I locate a spot where a door was cut into her hull for work of some kind, either at a shipyard or during lay-up.

Algosteel

Algosteel leaves the wall, and picks up speed on her way to Port Colborne. That’s the last I’ll see of her on this trip.

Atlantic Huron

Due up at Lock 7 is the Atlantic Huron.

Atlantic Huron

The 736 footer is heading to Sydney, Nova Scotia with a load of coal. Notice her widened side tanks.

Atlantic Huron

The Huron was built in 1984 as the straight-decker Prairie Harvest, but was eventually converted to a self-unloader. She is coastal class and often works on semi-coastal runs for CSL, such as carrying coal from the Great Lakes to a port like Sydney.

Atlantic Huron

The self-unloading control room almost seems to be its own wheelhouse.

Atlantic Huron

One odd thing about Atlantic Huron is her traditional lifeboats. I thought all semi-saltwater ships had modern ocean-style lifeboats, but the Huron has this instead.

Atlantic Huron

She pulls into Lock 7, scraping the sides with her 78 foot beam, and gets ready to go down.

Pineglen

After the Huron, her fleetmate Pineglen was next, and I caught her coming out of the Lock.

Pineglen

The straight-deck Pineglen is heading to Thunder Bay to load grain, which is pretty much the only thing she carries.

Pineglen

CSL’s other grain carriers also dabble in the ore trades, but Pineglen has none of that nonsense.

Pineglen

CSL went lazy on her banner, choosing not to paint the full company name.

Pineglen

The lighting at Lock 7 is finally starting to turn nice in the early afternoon, but the Pineglen is my last boat of the trip and it’s time to head back home.

Pineglen

So off she goes, and off I go, back to Michigan to finally relax a little.

That was truly an incredible trip, and it was probably the best trip I’ve ever taken (from a boatwatching standpoint). Sure, there was the loss of the camera for the last two days, but the memories will be there forever: The John D. Leitch in Hamilton, the Desgagnés ships in Côte Ste. Catherine, the tug action in Québec City, the Algoma Montrealais in Port Weller, and the Algosteel on the last day – those are just some of the highlights. I hope you enjoyed them all as much as I did.

But now, importantly, what else do I have to post? I could try to come up with something… stay tuned.

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Steeling the Show

July 1st – my last day at the Welland Canal, possibly for quite a long time. I guess I ought to make it a good one.

English River

The first ship of the morning is a repeat visitor, the English River. This officially marks my first time catching the same ship on upbound and downbound transits of the canal during a single visit here! The River is heading back to Bath to load.

Whitefish Bay

The next ship is also a repeat for this trip – the Whitefish Bay. Three days earlier, I caught her passing Québec City. She’s finally caught up to me again, still carrying that ore cargo to Toledo.

English River and Algosteel

After that, I leave the hotel room for the first time (besides breakfast) and run down to shoot at Bridge 5 for the first time this trip. I used this spot quite a bit last year. English River is heading for Lock 3, which has just been vacated by an oncoming Algosteel.

Algosteel

That makes two ships on up-and-down canal transits since I’ve been here. But the downbound Algosteel transit came only about 30 hours before this.

Algosteel

After quickly unloading an ore cargo in Hamilton, the Steel is heading back to Lake Superior for another one.

Algosteel

Things seem to be getting a bit rusty around the aft region…

Algosteel

Although her stack is still mostly shiny.

Algosteel

The Algosteel‘s stern is one-of-a-kind among ships built at Davie Shipbuilding. She was also the only laker ever built for Labrador Steamship, a Canadian spin-off of Interlake Steamship.

Algosteel

But she spent very little time under the Labrador banner, and has been with Algoma for over 40 years now.

Algosteel

And unfortunately, she’s headed to Lock 4, so I have to bid the Algosteel adieu for now.

Everlast

When I return to Lock 7, the tug Everlast is vacating, pushing her out-of-sight asphalt barge Norman McLeod. It’s down there somewhere.

Algosea and Algoma Navigator

The Algosea comes through next, but I decided not to grab any bow shots of her. I was, however, motivated to shoot her fleetmate Algoma Navigator.

Algoma Navigator

The Navigator is headed to Johnstown, ON with a partial cargo of salt. She will then unload the other part at Côte Ste. Catherine.

Algoma Navigator

The Navigator consists of a 1980s Canadian cargo section and bow attached to a 1960s saltie stern. Powered by a rare Doxford diesel engine, she continues to provide useful service for Algoma.

Algoma Navigator

The Navigator churns up water as she moves into the Lock. Now I have to wait for her to be lowered…

Algoma Navigator

And then go shoot her again. Something about this view always seems funny to me.

Algoma Navigator

It’s like I could just jump onboard!

Algoma Navigator

Wow, her cabins are a little rusty there.

Algosteel and Algoma Navigator

You may notice a boat in Lock 6 waiting for the Navigator to clear the approach area.

Algosteel and Navigator

It appears to be the Algosteel once again, and she makes her approach to 7 as the Navigator gets comfortable in 6.

Algosteel

Don’t worry, she’s not coming directly at me. Well, she sort of is. But she’ll divert course as the approach wall directs her into the lock.

Navigator and Algosteel

No salutes were exchanged between the fleetmates as they passed… I’ve seen it on the Detroit River but never here.

Algosteel

This is about as wide as the camera can go while still getting the whole ship, so I should probably go to close-ups instead.

Algosteel

Notice the rust spots on her deck and hatch covers. Could use a nice sandblasting and painting.

Algosteel

Well, she’s in and ready to go up, but that’ll be all for today.

Tomorrow, watch out for the last (yes, the last) post from my trip! The only problem is, July 1st was my last time boatwatching, and I have nothing else to post after tomorrow’s shots. Well, I’ll have to get back out there soon.

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